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English Vocabulary - Vocabulario de inglés
IDIOMS WITH PARTS OF THE BODY
¿Qué es un idiom?
Un "idiom" o "idiomatic expression" es una frase idiomática utilizada en lenguaje coloquial informal. En general, el significado de la frase en sí es diferente al significado normal de cada palabra por separado. Por ejemplo, "to let the cat out of the bag" significa "revelar un secreto". Si traducimos palabra por palabra, sería "dejar salir al gato de la bolsa", lo cual es incorrecto.

La dificultad para los estudiantes de inglés radica en que no pueden traducirse literalmente y deben aprenderse de memoria, aunque en algunos casos existen equivalentes muy similares en el idioma español.

Lee las explicaciones de cada idiom y luego realiza el ejercicio.

Idioms with EAR

  • to be all ears = listen with attention and interest.
    He was all ears when I told him I had free tickets for the cinema.
  • to be out on one's ear = be forced to leave a place because something wrong has been done.
    You should work harder or you'll be out on your ear.
  • to be up to one's ears (in something) = be extremely busy.
    I'm sorry I didn't call you yesterday, but I was up to my ears in work.
  • to turn a deaf ear to something = ignore something unwelcome, like criticism or complaints.
    I told him not to park there but he just turned a deaf ear to it.
  • to close/shut your ears to something = refuse to listen to bad or unpleasant news.
    Please, listen to him, don't shut you ears to his warning.
  • to go in (at) one ear and out (at) the other = to forget something almost immediately after hearing it.
    I don't know why I tell her. It just goes in one ear and out the other. 
  • to play by ear = play an instrument from memory.
  • to keep one's ears open = to listen in order to find out what is happening.
    Please keep your ears open for anything unusual.
  • to have something coming out of one's ears = have too much of something.
    At this time of year, shops have Christmas lightings coming out of their ears.

 

Exercise
Choose the right answer.

1. Albert has made a lot of mistakes and now he is .

2. Thomas doesn't need to read the music, he just .

3. When the director spoke to Elaine, she was  .

4. For Halloween, every place has pumpkins  .

5. I think I heard something at the kitchen. Please go down and .

6. Tom would never listen to me. Everything I say  .

7. Norbert had a lot of work yesterday, he was really .

Score:
   
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